“A house without books is like a room without windows.” Heinrich Mann

Ed Decker, Rewireme.com, wrote the following reasons why reading to a child is so important.

1. “Reading to a child or with a child creates strong human connection. The nurturing aspect of sitting with someone while being read to provides a comforting and bonding experience that transcends mere diversion or education.

2. It establishes associations between pictures and words.  Even infants only a few months old are capable of looking at pictures and listening to a voice. Pointing at pictures and describing them contribute to the wiring process that connects images to words and helps a child recognize the importance of language.

3. It builds neural connections through repetition. Reading on a daily basis helps strengthen initially fragile connections among neurons into ones with staying power. If a child wants to hear the same book many nights in a row, hang in there. What’s boring for the storyteller may serve the child’s emotional and learning needs at the time.

4. It fosters imagination. It’s a lot easier to see yourself as a heroic character in an exotic location after meeting characters in books.

5. It helps children make sense of the world. Children’s curiosity is fueled by stories they hear, and these stories expand their vocabulary and knowledge to help them better navigate the world around them and determine how they fit into our world.”

Thank you to Ed Decker and for his insight into the importance of reading to a child.

“A house without books is like a room without windows.” Heinrich Mann

The Lost Polymath

The Mystery Hunters Series

 The Lost Polymath
Book One: Continents

Sarah and Christian both dream mysterious dreams. These dreams transport them around the corner, around the globe, and through the universe and back. They’re first cousins and best friends who plan mystery hunts every summer.

Christian’s and Sarah’s grandmother, Tata, had this same gift of prophetic dreams. She called them waking dreams because she dreamt of echoes from the future and then, suddenly, woke up.

She instructed her grandchildren to be cautious of the invisible force that would try to disrupt or stop their quests. She warned them, “This invisible force will try to frighten you, change your circumstances, alter your path, and place obstacles in your way. You were given a special gift. Use it wisely.”

Sarah and Christian were the same age. Christian resembled his dad and his Uncle Virgil, Sarah’s dad. He had dark wavy hair, deep blue-green eyes, and on most days, a half-smile. Sarah described their friendship as “not just family, but Mystery Hunters.”

The Mystery Hunters Series begins with The Lost Polymath. Sarah and Christian have mysterious dreams that provide clues to help solve each mystery on their journey, while an unseen force tries to stop them from completing their quest. This series engages the reader and a friend to become members of the team. The reader will answer 7 questions in bold. We provided two blank pages for the reader to draw themselves (in pencil) in two scenes from the book while listening to their favorite song by their favorite musical artist.

“Be Careful What You Say Around A Pregnant Woman…”

Blueberry Pi

Sciencemag.org: “Be careful what you say around a pregnant woman. As a fetus grows inside a mother’s belly, it can hear sounds from the outside world—and can understand them well enough to retain memories of them after birth, according to new research. It may seem implausible that fetuses can listen to speech within the womb, but the sound-processing parts of their brain become active in the last two trimesters of pregnancy, and sound carries fairly well through the mother’s abdomen. ‘Prenatal babies can hear the rhythm of speech, rhythm of music, and so on,’ says cognitive neuroscientist Eino Partanen of the University of Helsinki. A 1988 study suggested that newborns recognize the theme song from their mother’s favorite soap opera. More recent studies have expanded on the idea of fetal learning, indicating that newborns already familiarized themselves with sounds of their parent’s native language; one showed that American newborns seem to perceive Swedish vowel sounds as unfamiliar. Swedish infants showed the same response to English vowels.”

Happy Thanksgiving to All Our Dear Friends in the US!

Blueberry Pi, Mathematics: Book Two

A scene from our second book on Mathematics, “Blueberry Pi”

While 2020 has been a very difficult time for all of us, please remember to be thankful for the blessings in your life – no matter where you live in the world! Share a piece of pie, share your thoughts and prayers for each other. Read to your child today, and if you are pregnant, read to your beautiful baby who is about to enter our world! Read a story, read a prayer or write a beautiful note to your child, date it, and keep it in a treasured box. We wish our world better days. God bless, The Palmer Family.

Womb to BLOOM to Classroom – Blog

    

“A book is a dream that you hold in your hand.” Neil Gaiman

In early 2019 my son and I created a new company, Womb to Bloom to Classroom. We offer beautifully illustrated picture books, by artist Kimmo Hellström, for our target audience of parents, grandparents, and preschool teachers to introduce “concepts” in Mathematics, Astronomy, Archaeology, Science, and more.

Researchers have introduced statistical evidence about the importance of reading to and with children. Early education researchers agree that 85% of a child’s brain develops by the time they turn 4! We believe babies and young children should be flooded with beautiful images and concepts on subjects introduced later in school.

We hope to encourage adults to read picture books to prenatal babies, to preschool children, and kids … from Womb to BLOOM to Classroom. There are over 40 million children in the U.S. from the ages of one day to 7 years old. Many of these children hear roughly 30 million fewer words by the age of three than other children in the U.S. Our goal is to change these statistics by creating children’s books from Womb to BLOOM to Classroom.

On Jan. 1, 2021, we will introduce our Womb to BLOOM to Classroom Series, beginning with our first book, Numbers from Heaven, Mathematics: Book One. On February 1, 2021, the second book in the series, Blueberry Pi, Mathematics: Book Two, will be released.

On January 1, 2021, we will release the first book in our Mystery Hunters Series, The Lost Polymath, Book One: Continents. On April 1, 2021, our second book in this series, Chaos & The Missing Butterfly, Book Two: Mathematics, will be released. This series is for kids 8-13. Sarah and Christian have mysterious dreams that provide clues to help solve each mystery on their journey, while an unseen force tries to stop them from completing their quest. This series engages the reader and a friend to become members of the team.

The reader will become a member of the Mystery Hunters team and answer 7 questions in each of the seven chapters. The reader is also encouraged to draw two pictures in the book while listening to their favorite song. Kids will learn and be entertained while reading books in this series on Mathematics, Science, Continents, Mythology, Astronomy, and more.

“A house without books is like a room without windows.” Heinrich Mann

We hope each child enjoys these adventures and that you come along for the ride!